2012 Wolf Special Edition Newsletter

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TAKE ACTION

  • Sign up for NM Wild’s wolf action alert list and get all the latest on what is going on in our campaign for the Mexican gray wolf. To sign up, just send an e-mail to news@nmwild.org with the subject “Wolf Action Alert List.”
  • Help prevent a second extinction of Mexican wolves! Join others in calling for the release of more wolves into the wild. We urge you to contact your public officials every month until there is a policy change.
  • If you are a member of the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, we urge you to cancel your membership because of this organization’s stand against wolves. We urge everyone to write or call David Allen, asking him to stop his anti-wolf rhetoric: David Allen, President and CEO of the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, 5705 Grant Creek Rd., Missoula, MT 59808 or 406-225-5355.
  • Please contact Governor Susana Martinez and ask her to rejoin New Mexico into the federal wolf recovery program. Please also ask her to appoint more conservation-minded people onto the Game Commission, which would benefit efforts for wilderness and wolf recovery in the state. Phone: 505-476-2200, Online contact form here.

 

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